Saturday, 21 June 2014

Healthy Diet Food Healthy Food Pyramid Recipes Clipart List for Kids Plate Pictures Images Tumblr Quotes

Healthy Diet Food Biography

Source(google.com.pk)
Combine yeast and sugar.  Pour warm water over the top and let proof for 10 minutes.
Add oil, salt, and two cups of whole wheat flour. Mix in a large stand mixer with your dough hook, or with a regular mixer with as much of the flour as the mixer can handle.
If using a stand mixer, add the rest of the whole wheat flour and then the white flour and knead in the bowl for about 5 minutes.  If not, mix in as much flour as your mixer can handle, then take it out of the bowl and knead by hand for 10 minutes.
Place dough in a lightly-greased bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and let rise for about one hour.
Punch dough down and divide into eight pieces.
Roll each half into loaf-shapes. 
Place loaves onto two large baking sheets lined with parchment paper or a well greased mini loaf pan.
Cover the eight loaves and allow to rise for about an hour.
Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
Cook for 25 minutes, or until the top of the loaves are golden brown.
Vegetable options

Green peppers, chopped
Shredded carrots
Avocado
Jalapenos
Spinach
Roasted Red peppers
Pickles
Banana Peppers
Lettuce, shredded
Tomatoes, chopped
Cucumbers, thinly sliced
and Olives, chopped (sliced would work too)

After baking, we took out our veggies for the sandwiches.  We used (from top to bottom):

Green peppers, chopped
Shredded carrots
Avocado
Jalapenos
Spinach
Roasted Red peppers
Pickles
Banana Peppers
Lettuce, shredded
Tomatoes, chopped
Cucumbers, thinly sliced
and Olives, chopped (sliced would work too)

To make our sandwich bar just like Subway's, we had two things in mind. One, to make our hoagie rolls. And second, to find as many veggie toppings as we could come up with.  

Our bread, we adapted this recipe from Copycat Recipe Guide (and replaced the regular flour with whole wheat flour and the soybean oil with Grape Seed Oil)- Our full recipe is below.

We then baked our bread in a mini loaf pan- because we like small things!  You don't need a loaf pan. You can also divide your bread into 8 logs and bake it on a cookie sheet.

Nutrition panels can be confusing, but if you know how to read them they’re a useful source of information to help you make comparisons before you buy. It is important to look at the food as a whole rather than making purchasing decisions based on just one nutrient alone.

There are four main nutrients to look out for when shopping for foods:

Kilojoules
Sodium (salt)
Fibre
Saturated and Trans Fat
The main benefit of the nutrition panels is to compare the nutrient content of different varieties of similar foods. The quantity per 100 gram column is best when comparing similar products across different brands. The 'per serving' value allows you to understand nutrients in the amount in a serve. 

Nutrients that are always listed in the panel are: energy (kilojoules), protein, fat (total), saturated fat, carbohydrate (total), sugars and sodium. Additional nutrients such as vitamins and minerals are also listed, usually to support any nutritional claims the product is making.

Let’s take a closer look at this nutrition information panel for cereal bars.

Look for ‘Sugars’ on the Nutrition Information Panel of your product label. ‘Sugars’ is a total of added sugars and naturally occurring sugars.
The Heart Foundation recommends that Australians limit their intake of foods containing high amounts of added sugars. There are many names for added sugars, so look in the ingredients list for: sucrose, glucose, high fructose corn syrup, maltose, dextrose, raw sugar, cane sugar, malt extract and molasses.
Sugars occur naturally in fruit (fructose) and dairy foods (lactose). So while low fat milk may have higher levels of naturally occurring sugar (lactose), you’re also getting the goodness of calcium, protein and other nutrients. Other low fat dairy products and fresh or dried fruit can be higher in naturally occurring sugar and still be nutritious when eaten as part of a balanced diet.
When a product label says ‘No Added Sugar’ the product may contain naturally occurring sugars e.g. lactose (milk sugar) and fructose (fruit sugar), but no additional sugars have been added to the product.

Made up of mostly added sugar or saturated fat, a chocolate bar or soft drink is rightly considered to be a poor food choice because it’s also low in nutrients so all it gives your body is kilojoules with few nutrients.
Foods with the Tick must meet strict levels of kilojoules. As sugar provides kilojoules, this limits the amount of sugar that a Tick product may contain.

In Australia, the latest government recommendations do not specify a daily limit for carbohydrate, sugar or added sugar intake.  However for the prevention of heart disease and other chronic disease, it is suggested that all carbohydrate intake be between 45%-65% of your daily energy intake. 

What are carbohydrates?
Many people think of rice, potatoes and pasta as 'carbs' but that's only a small part of the huge range of foods know as carbohydrates. All fruit and vegetables, all breads and all cereal products are carbohydrates as well as sugars and sugary foods.

The goal of healthy eating is to develop a diet that you can maintain for life, not just a few weeks or months, or until you've hit your ideal weight. For most of us, that means eating less than we do now. More specifically, it means eating far less of the unhealthy stuff (refined sugar, saturated fat, for example) and replacing it with the healthy (such as fresh fruit and vegetables). But it doesn't mean eliminating the foods you love. Eating bacon for breakfast once a week, for example, could be considered moderation if you follow it with a healthy lunch and dinner—but not if you follow it with a box of donuts and a sausage pizza. If you eat 100 calories of chocolate one afternoon, balance it out by deducting 100 calories from your evening meal. If you're still hungry, fill up with an extra serving of fresh vegetables.

Try not to think of certain foods as “off-limits.” When you ban certain foods or food groups, it is natural to want those foods more, and then feel like a failure if you give in to temptation. If you are drawn towards sweet, salty, or unhealthy foods, start by reducing portion sizes and not eating them as often. If the rest of your diet is healthy, eating a burger and fries once a week probably won’t have too much of a detrimental effect on your health. Eating junk food just once a month will have even less of an impact. As you reduce your intake of unhealthy foods, you may find yourself craving them less or thinking of them as only occasional indulgences.
Think smaller portions. Serving sizes have ballooned recently, particularly in restaurants. When dining out, choose a starter instead of an entree, split a dish with a friend, and don't order supersized anything. At home, use smaller plates, think about serving sizes in realistic terms, and start small. If you don't feel satisfied at the end of a meal, try adding more leafy green vegetables or rounding off the meal with fresh fruit. Visual cues can help with portion sizes–your serving of meat, fish, or chicken should be the size of a deck of cards and half a cup of mashed potato, rice, or pasta is about the size of a traditional light bulb.
Healthy eating tip 3: It's not just what you eat, it's how you eat
Healthy Eating
Healthy eating is about more than the food on your plate—it is also about how you think about food. Healthy eating habits can be learned and it is important to slow down and think about food as nourishment rather than just something to gulp down in between meetings or on the way to pick up the kids.

Eat with others whenever possible. Eating with other people has numerous social and emotional benefits—particularly for children—and allows you to model healthy eating habits. Eating in front of the TV or computer often leads to mindless overeating.
Take time to chew your food and enjoy mealtimes. Chew your food slowly, savoring every bite. We tend to rush though our meals, forgetting to actually taste the flavors and feel the textures of our food. Reconnect with the joy of eating.
Listen to your body. Ask yourself if you are really hungry, or have a glass of water to see if you are thirsty instead of hungry. During a meal, stop eating before you feel full. It actually takes a few minutes for your brain to tell your body that it has had enough food, so eat slowly.
Eat breakfast, and eat smaller meals throughout the day. A healthy breakfast can jumpstart your metabolism, and eating small, healthy meals throughout the day (rather than the standard three large meals) keeps your energy up and your metabolism going.
Avoid eating at night. Try to eat dinner earlier in the day and then fast for 14-16 hours until breakfast the next morning. Early studies suggest that this simple dietary adjustment—eating only when you’re most active and giving your digestive system a long break each day—may help to regulate weight. After-dinner snacks tend to be high in fat and calories so are best avoided, anyway.
Healthy eating tip 4: Fill up on colorful fruits and vegetables
Shop the perimeter of the grocery storeFruits and vegetables are the foundation of a healthy diet. They are low in calories and nutrient dense, which means they are packed with vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and fiber.

Try to eat a rainbow of fruits and vegetables every day and with every meal—the brighter the better. Colorful, deeply colored fruits and vegetables contain higher concentrations of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants—and different colors provide different benefits, so eat a variety. Aim for a minimum of five portions each day.

Some great choices include:

Greens. Branch out beyond bright and dark green lettuce. Kale, mustard greens, broccoli, and Chinese cabbage are just a few of the options—all packed with calcium, magnesium, iron, potassium, zinc, and vitamins A, C, E, and K.
Sweet vegetables. Naturally sweet vegetables—such as corn, carrots, beets, sweet potatoes, yams, onions, and squash—add healthy sweetness to your meals and reduce your cravings for other sweets.
Fruit. Fruit is a tasty, satisfying way to fill up on fiber, vitamins, and antioxidants. Berries are cancer-fighting, apples provide fiber, oranges and mangos offer vitamin C, and so on.
The importance of getting vitamins from food—not pills
The antioxidants and other nutrients in fruits and vegetables help protect against certain types of cancer and other diseases. And while advertisements abound for supplements promising to deliver the nutritional benefits of fruits and vegetables in pill or powder form, research suggests that it’s just not the same.

Healthy Diet Food Healthy Food Pyramid Recipes Clipart List for Kids Plate Pictures Images Tumblr Quotes 
Healthy Diet Food Healthy Food Pyramid Recipes Clipart List for Kids Plate Pictures Images Tumblr Quotes 
Healthy Diet Food Healthy Food Pyramid Recipes Clipart List for Kids Plate Pictures Images Tumblr Quotes 
Healthy Diet Food Healthy Food Pyramid Recipes Clipart List for Kids Plate Pictures Images Tumblr Quotes 
Healthy Diet Food Healthy Food Pyramid Recipes Clipart List for Kids Plate Pictures Images Tumblr Quotes 
Healthy Diet Food Healthy Food Pyramid Recipes Clipart List for Kids Plate Pictures Images Tumblr Quotes 
Healthy Diet Food Healthy Food Pyramid Recipes Clipart List for Kids Plate Pictures Images Tumblr Quotes 
Healthy Diet Food Healthy Food Pyramid Recipes Clipart List for Kids Plate Pictures Images Tumblr Quotes 
Healthy Diet Food Healthy Food Pyramid Recipes Clipart List for Kids Plate Pictures Images Tumblr Quotes 
Healthy Diet Food Healthy Food Pyramid Recipes Clipart List for Kids Plate Pictures Images Tumblr Quotes 
Healthy Diet Food Healthy Food Pyramid Recipes Clipart List for Kids Plate Pictures Images Tumblr Quotes 
Healthy Diet Food Healthy Food Pyramid Recipes Clipart List for Kids Plate Pictures Images Tumblr Quotes 

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